Chambray




In terms of construction, Chambray is generally a plain, closely woven double-ply cotton. It’s very soft and smooth and often has a slight luster to it. It can be woven in a multitude of weights, making it versatile, strong and hard wearing and thus good for both shirting and outerwear.
As said the fabric itself is a double-ply cotton, made from a dyed warp (the vertical thread) and either a white or unbleached filling (the horizontal thread) with either carded or combed yarns being used. It normally has a white selvedge (the edge of the fabric, woven to prevent unraveling) although it’s rare this is carried through to the garments themselves like it is with denim.
The colouring of the fabric is often a light blue, which combined with it’s manufacturing process gives it the look of denim (but it’s not). Blue isn’t the only colour of chambray though, it’s also available in red, black, in checked and striped cloth and is even embroidered sometimes. So as you can see, it’s much more than just the pale blue that’s become so ubiquitous. That colouring though is generally very soft which over time fades to create that lovely worn in look, sometimes almost becoming white with repeated washing.